CO Poisoning Home

Carbon monoxide (CO) is a toxic gas that you cannot see or smell. CO is given off whenever fuel or other combustible materials are burned. All people and animals are at risk of carbon monoxide poisoning. Breathing high levels of CO can cause severe illness or death in a matter of minutes.
It is important to follow safety advisories to prevent poisoning: do not use portable generators inside your home, garage, carport, basement or any other enclosed space, such as a covered porch; do not use charcoal or gas grills or camping stoves inside your home; do not use propane or kerosene heaters inside your home; and do not use your gas oven or stove top to heat your home.
The data viewed here are the counts of CO poisoning cases and the number of deaths by year.

Learn More about Carbon Monoxide:
Connecticut Carbon Monoxide
CDC Carbon Monoxide

The Nationally Consistent Data Measures (NCDMs) for CO Poisoning are:

    Emergency Department Visits
  • Annual age-adjusted rate of emergency department visits for CO Poisoning per 100,000 population
  • Annual crude rate of emergency department visits for CO Poisoning per 100,000 population
  • Annual number of emergency department visits for CO Poisoning
    Hospitalization
  • Age-adjusted rate of hospitalization for CO Poisoning per 100,000 population
  • Crude rate of hospitalization for CO Poisoning per 100,000 population
  • Number of hospitalizations for CO Poisoning

Each of the CO Poisoning NCDMs are available using the charts on this page.
  • Select the measure using the Measure dropdown.
  • Choose the grouping by selecting an option from the X-Axis dropdown.
  • Filter the results by any of the available demographic options by checking the option in the corresponding dropdown.
    If no option is selected the total for that demographic will be used when calculating the results.
    For example if no county selection is made the data will be state totals.
  • Press the filter button to redraw the chart.

Since October 1, 2015, all causes of emergency department (ED) visit and hospitalization are classified according to the ICD-10-CM classification system. The ICD-9-CM coding system was used for ED visits and hospitalizations occurring before October 1, 2015. The cause of ED visit and hospitalization classifications before 2015 are not directly comparable to classifications for 2016 or later. In addition, the classifications for calendar year 2015 are not directly comparable to either time periods because of the mix of codes used during this year.

Emergency Department Visit Measures


Measure:
Select X-Axis:
  • Select Year
  • Select County
  • Select Age Group
  • Select Gender
  • Select Race
  • Select Ethnicity
  • Select Fire
  • Select Intentional
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Hospitalization Measures


Measure:
Select X-Axis:
  • Select Year
  • Select County
  • Select Age Group
  • Select Gender
  • Select Race
  • Select Ethnicity
  • Select Fire
  • Select Intentional
Filter
Export